i can sell you lies

insta @sitara.b

copyright2014:

i love being a TEEN. sleeping til noon, spraypainting the principals car, smoking drugs, contemporary art

(Source: 2ct7, via nosvideo)

Franz Kafka, the story goes, encountered a little girl in the park where he went walking daily. She was crying. She had lost her doll and was desolate.

Kafka offered to help her look for the doll and arranged to meet her the next day at the same spot. Unable to find the doll he composed a letter from the doll and read it to her when they met.

"Please do not mourn me, I have gone on a trip to see the world. I will write you of my adventures." This was the beginning of many letters. When he and the little girl met he read her from these carefully composed letters the imagined adventures of the beloved doll. The little girl was comforted.

When the meetings came to an end Kafka presented her with a doll. She obviously looked different from the original doll. An attached letter explained: “my travels have changed me… “

Many years later, the now grown girl found a letter stuffed into an unnoticed crevice in the cherished replacement doll. In summary it said: “every thing that you love, you will eventually lose, but in the end, love will return in a different form.”

May Benatar, Kafka and the Doll: The Pervasiveness of Loss

For me there are two wise lessons in this story: Grief and loss are ubiquitous even for a young child. And the way toward healing is to look for how love comes back in another form. - May Benatar

(via isolement)

(Source: easyreadingisdamnhardwriting, via technicolorshow)

Can’t believe I just finished school forever haha what he fuck this feels unreal

  • Tony Abbott: [pays tribute to Gough Whitlam]
  • Tony Abbott: [tears down everything that Gough Whitlam built up]

when the late night anxiet ysets in :-)

spookyrnormonhelldream:

Main sources of villainy in Les Mis:

  • bourgeoisie
  • capitalism
  • patriarchy
  • abuse of law
  • corrupt government
  • corrupt people in power

When explaining why Les Mis is still relevant in a modern society:

  • read the previous list
  • realise that at the very base of things not much has actually changed
  • accept that the underlying messages are still very much relevant
  • be afraid and very, very angry

(via wonderfulwhimsicality)

I think a lot of art is trying to make someone love you.

— Keaton Henson  (via dieworten)

(Source: le-manja, via punkgrl)

some photoz from today (2nd last day of school :—(( )

lmao today my bio teacher thought she smelt alcohol when I walked into the classroom and asked to smell my water bottle after class what the fuck

wisespookysheet:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

A really neat thing about these dolls (I just went through the website) is that they’re PRESENT DAY dolls! What I had loved about American Girl dolls in their prime were the history stories (although from a privileged white perspective most of the time), but these are to represent present day situations that kids can relate to them too.

World Vision, who sponsored these dolls, is a worldwide charity, so each doll’s stories is about how they help others. Aaaaa this is just really cool!!

(via it-s-only-the-beginning)

Fixed. theme by Andrew McCarthy